Friday, November 17, 2017

Elysian Charter School in Hoboken, NJ announces weighted lottery to benefit low-income students

Elysian Charter School, one of Hoboken’s three charter schools, announced last week that it has received approval from the New Jersey Department of Education to offer low-income families an extra chance at its lottery, which will be held Jan.17 at 1:30 p.m. for the 2018-2019 school year.

Any child who can provide proof that they live in Hoboken public housing or Hoboken Section 8 housing, who qualify for free or reduced lunch at their current public school, or can prove that either they or their guardian qualifies for SNAP/ TANF benefits, would get his or her name placed into the lottery twice rather than once.

“We are delighted to be able to offer low-income families in Hoboken an additional opportunity to attend Elysian, one of New Jersey’s first charter schools,” said Elysian Director Harry Laub. “While we have always worked to attract a diverse student population and already demonstrate a level of diversity that exceeds the city of Hoboken itself, this new weighted lottery will help us do more to broaden underprivileged Hoboken students’ access to additional public education options.”

“We hope that our new lottery preference, modeled after HOLA’s, will help raise awareness among families that might not know about all of their public school options, and then give them an increased chance once they apply,” said the board chair Eduardo Gonzalez. “As Elysian celebrates its 20th year, we hope to make our successful progressive education model even more accessible to all families in Hoboken, which we believe in turn will benefit the entire school and community.”

Lottery forms can be found on the school’s website at http://www.ecsnj.org or obtained at Elysian Charter School at 1460 Garden St. Hoboken, NJ. Registration forms be must be submitted by the deadline of Friday, Jan. 12 by 5 p.m. to be included in the lottery. They can be completed online, dropped off at the school or e-mailed to enrollment@ecsnj.org.

The school will host open houses on Nov. 27 at 6 p.m. Dec. 2 at 10 a.m. and Jan 6 at 10 a.m. Email enrollment@ecsnj.org or call the school office at 201-876-0102 with any questions.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Racist Flyers Stir More Controversy at Hoboken City Council Meeting As Law Enforcement Hunt People Behind It- WNBC News

The mayoral election in Hoboken is still making local and regional news as this WNBC-TV report indicates from November 14, 2017. There are a number of issue at stake- this segment does a very good job of summarizing the controversy in a short few minutes.




Monday, November 13, 2017

Hoboken Board of Education Meeting - Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Saturday, November 11, 2017

2016-17 QSAC Results: Hoboken District Does Not Satisfy INSTRUCTION AND PROGRAM DPR for 7th Straight Year

PATH Taxi Stand- Hoboken, NJ
November, 2017 
Summary: The Hoboken School District failed the 2016-17 QSAC DPR in INSTRUCTION AND PROGRAM for the 7th straight year. The district passed the four other QSAC DPRs. 

Background: Traditional New Jersey school districts must all undergo the Quality Single Accountability Continuum (QSAC). NJDOE staff review documents and analyze district performance against critical indicators in 5 QSAC areas. One of those areas, and I argue the most important, is INSTRUCTION AND PROGRAM. A score of 80% is seen as satisfying specific weighted indicators. 

Previous Success: While I was Assistant Superintendent, we were able to raise the QSAC score in INSTRUCTION AND PROGRAM from an initial score of 34% (a few months after we took over) to a high of 87%* in 2010 after the HBOE approved the revised curriculum and the results of the 2009 state test scores were analyzed.  
* 2010 QSAC scores were based largely on academic year 2008-09 while I was Assistant Superintendent 

Seven Years of Failing Scores: Unfortunately, after the 87% score in April of 2010, the Hoboken School District has scored below 80% each year in the QSAC INSTRUCTION AND PROGRAM DPR for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017.

Failure to Report 2016-17 QSAC Results: If you read the June 20, 2017 placement letter (below) you will find the following instructions to the District: 

Please be advised that QSAC regulations require your board of education to report these placement results at the next regularly scheduled board meeting.”  -June 20, 2017 NJDOE letter to the Board
A review of meeting agendas and televised meetings indicate the following: 

June 27, 2017- QSAC Results Not Presented to the Public as required  
July 25, 2017- QSAC Results Not Presented 
to the Public as required   
August 22, 2017- QSAC Results Not Presented to the Public as required  
September 12, 2017- QSAC Results Not Presented 
to the Public as required   
October 10, 2017- QSAC Results Not Presented 
to the Public as required 


2016-17 QSAC Placement- Hoboken School District
CLICK TO ENLARGE


Assurances:: The QSAC DPR for INSTRUCTION AND PROGRAM contains the following assurances a school district in New Jersey must meet (list is not exhaustive): 

  • Reports to the district BOE and the public the performance of all students on the NJ standardized testing system 
  • Communicates district graduation requirements 
  • Implements board-approved new and/or revised curricula aligned to the most recent State Board adopted version of the NJCCCS and CCSS and within the timeline for implementation 
  • Aligns career and technical education programs with the State Plan for Career and Technical Education 
Going Forward: Hopefully, the QSAC results will be discussed at an upcoming Board of Education Meeting as required and a plan better than the ones previously proposed will be articulated that will assure the children, parents and community that the Hoboken School District will satisfy criteria for the QSAC DPR INSTRUCTION AND PROGRAM and will end the 7 consecutive years of failure and return to at least the 87% numbers of 2010. 

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Author Molly Makris Discusses Ramifications of School Choice in Hoboken


NJTV News reports.... A three-year moratorium on charter schools has been introduced in the state Senate after years of generating controversy — criticized in Newark for siphoning off state funding, co-mingled with public schools to raise test scorers in Camden and in Hoboken, seemingly exacerbating the divide between those who live in newly gentrified neighborhoods and those in public housing. Molly Makris takes a look at the relationship between gentrification and de facto school segregation in her book, Public Housing and School Choice in a Gentrified City. She sat down with NJTV NewsAnchor Mary Alice Williams to discuss her findings.
According to Makris, Hoboken’s charter school system is very different than other cities’ models. “Hoboken’s charter schools are not the no excuses charter schools,” she said. “They’re homegrown, locally grown by parents in the community largely, and they attract advantaged children, white advantaged children and they don’t have extended school days. They don’t have extended school years. I write in the book that these are charter schools where the children in after school take chocolate making classes, they have trips to Puerto Rico, classes on genocide.”
While Makris said in some ways the charter system reflects the broader demographics of Hoboken because it is a very gentrified community, about 11 percent of residents live below the poverty level. Makris’ book examines young people in public housing specifically. She said she found there are largely three reasons why public housing residents aren’t applying to the charter schools.
“One is a desire for their neighborhood schools. So there’s a community school where they have a neighborhood feel. Many of the public housing residents went to that school themselves. They feel that their children are safe and protected in that school. It’s convenient,” Makris said. “There’s also a level of what I call charter confusion, which is that parents in public housing are unaware that these charter schools are an option. They think they cost money, that they are private school. I see this actually with advantaged parents too but when their children hit school age, their social networks inform them about the option and that’s not happening within this community. And lastly, there’s a desire to fit in. So public housing residents, like all parents, want their children to fit in in their school. And there’s a feeling they won’t in the charter schools.”
School choice in Hoboken isn’t just happening with charter schools, Makris said. There is also intradistrict school choose, so parents can send their children to three different elementary schools. “Advantaged parents often opt for the school that doesn’t serve the majority of public housing students. So it’s not just about the charter schools. It’s about school choice in general. And my book really looks at how school choice in general gives parents these options and parents are making very different choices, sometimes informed and sometimes not,” Makris said.
State Education Commissioner David Hespe ruled one of the charter schools could expand because it didn’t effectively segregate. That ruling came after Makris finished conducting research for her book, but she said she’s been following the issues. “It’s a very contentious topic in the community with supporters of the charter schools and supporters of the district schools both claiming that it’s not true. I argue that really both sides could do a better job of representing the community as a whole and creating these racially and socioeconomically integrated options,” she said

More Information:
Interview with Molly Makris by JerseyJazzman: CLICK HERE
Faulty Page: CLICK HERE 

Hoboken Election Results: November 2017

Hoboken Mayor-Elect Ravi Bhalla 
HOBOKEN, NJ — Which local candidates emerged victorious in Hoboken for 2017? A crowded field of 27 candidates for the city's mayoral, city council and board of education was narrowed down on Tuesday.
Here are the election results, according to the Hudson County Clerk's Office.
MAYOR
With 40 of 40 districts reported and 13,997 total votes, here are the election results:
  • Ravi Bhalla – 4,781 votes (34.16%)
  • Michael DeFusco – 4,116 votes (29.41%)
  • Jen Giattino – 2,424 votes (17.32%)
  • Anthony Romano – 2,254 votes (16.1%)
  • Karen Nason – 225 votes (1.61%)
  • Ronald Bautista – 193 votes (1.38%)
Council Elect- Vanessa Falco
CITY COUNCIL AT-LARGE (3 Open Seats)
With 40 of 40 districts reported and 33,190 total votes, here are the election results:
  • James Doyle - 3,902 (11.76%)
  • Emily Jabbour - 3,772 (11.36%)
  • Vanessa Falco - 3,506 (10.56%)
  • John Allen - 3,391 (10.22%)
  • Michael Flett - 3,260 (9.82%)
  • Andrew Impastato - 2,939 (8.86%)
  • Charles '''Buddy''' Matthews - 1,945 (5.86%)
  • Angelo Valente - 1,930 (5.82%)
  • James Aibel - 1,898 (5.72%)
  • Jason Ellis - 1,704 (5.13%)
  • Sal Starace - 1,560 (4.7%)
  • David Mello - 1,479 (4.46%)
  • Laini A. Hammond - 1,058 (3.19%)
  • Joshua Einstein – 832 votes (2.51%)
  • Personal Choice, write-in – 14 (0.04%)



BOARD OF EDUCATION (3 Open Seats)
With 40 of 40 districts reported and 20,520 total votes, here are the election results:


  • Melanie B. Tekirian - 3,665 (17.86%)
  • Sharyn Angley - 3,630 (17.69%)
  • Chetali Khanna - 3,509 (17.1%)
  • Peter Biancamano - 3,097 (15.09%)
  • Anne Marie Schreiber - 2,748 votes (13.39%)
  • Lauren Eagle - 2,107 (10.27%)
  • Patricia Waiters - 1,752 (8.54%)
  • Personal Choice, write-in – 12 (0.06%)

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Most Recent Hudson County Median Teacher Salaries

Ragamuffin Parade- Hoboken, NJ 2017
Here is the whole list of New Jersey school districts and charter schools, and their 2015-16 median teacher salaries, from highest to lowest. All data is taken from the New Jersey Department of Education. There were 647 districts included in this analysis.

Median is not an average. Median is the number which splits the dataset into half. Therefore, there are just as many people ABOVE the median as there are BELOW the median. The median is often a better statistic to look for when comparing salaries since a few highly skewed salaries can over influence an “average” but has much less effect on the “median.” These salary numbers do not include stipends or summer employment.

Hudson County, New Jersey- Traditional Public School Districts
(county rank) State Rank.

(1)   35.    Hoboken, Hudson $79,614
(2)   73.    Jersey City, Hudson $72,960
(3)   84.    Harrison, Hudson $72,002
(4)   95.    North Bergen, Hudson $71,100
(5)   193.  Union City, Hudson $66,050
(6)   237.  West New York, Hudson $64,463
(7)   241.  Hudson County Vocational, Hudson $64,257
(8)   261.  Kearny, Hudson $63,589
(9)   482.  Weehawken, Hudson $56,230
(10) 495.  Bayonne, Hudson $55,690
(11) 535.  Guttenberg, Hudson $53,790
(12) 647.  East Newark, Hudson $40,922

FACT SHEET: Supporting Dual Language Learners in Early Learning Settings

Ragamuffin Parade, Hoboken NJ 2017
Much of the research and support for Dual Language Learning was known when I first proposed a dual language program for the Hoboken School District in 2009. Unfortunately, many Hoboken Board of Education members felt they knew what was best for the district and so a majority of the Board of Education voted against allowing a dual language program into the Hoboken Public Schools (Hoboken Reporter Coverage). There was financial resources for the program, there was support from the State, there was adequate classroom space in the district (we had over 8 classrooms immediately available), there was solid research on the effectiveness of dual language education in the early grades, and there was more than adequate interest from parents in the city for a dual language program (a poll was conducted with very positive results and was reported to the Board). 

At the time, members of the "Kids First" political group and its Hoboken Board of Education board members made unsubstantiated claims that the dual language program did not meet certain bidding requirements. This was a clearly false claim. I assured the Board and the public this was not the case and that the program was in compliance. This was verified on February 20, 2009 when the district received correspondence from the New Jersey Department of Education indicting that the HOLA Dual Language Program intended for the Hoboken Public Schools met requirements under N. J. S. A. 18A:18A-5a(2).


Nonetheless, the program did not have majority support from the Hoboken Board of Education and it was rejected by a single vote (4-3). Today, that dual language program is an award winning charter school with state, regional, and national recognition.

In the end, things worked out well for the dual language program and very well for the students and families who now attend the school. How well? 2016 PARCC scores place the school tied for first in the entire state of NJ in some areas (8th in the state of NJ). Unfortunately, the students of the traditional Hoboken Public Schools were denied this opportunity for a state of the art dual language program that was years ahead of its time. The schools these students attend are currently ranked 346th on the same PARCC assessment. I would have much rather seen the dual language program in the Hoboken Public Schools. Unfortunately, that was not to be. But I am happy that hundreds of children are now enjoying and being enriched by a dual language program years ahead of its time and offered as part of free, public education in Hoboken, NJ. 


Now, please take a few moments and read about all the benefits of dual language instruction and early childhood education. - Dr. Petrosino


In 2016 it was announced that in January 2017 the White House would release a new Federal policy statement from the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Education on better supporting our country’s youngest dual language learners (DLLs) in early childhood programs. The Obama Administration (and so far the Trump Administration) was joined by public and private sector organizations that will also announce new commitments to support DLLs. Additionally, the White House, in collaboration with Too Small to Fail and Invest in US, is holding a regional convening today at the United Way Center for Excellence in Early Education in Miami, FL to highlight the importance of supporting our country’s DLLs in early childhood programs.

Data indicate that about one in five school-aged children speak a language other than English at home, a figure that has more than doubled in the past few decades. Estimates suggest that this number may be even higher for learners under the age of six; for example, nearly a third of children in Head Start programs are DLLs. Research with young DLLs clearly reflects that children’s bilingual skill development promotes overall language development and should be encouraged.

The Federal policy statement being released today recognizes the cultural and linguistic assets of this population of children, and provides important resources and recommendations to the early childhood field to ensure that our nation’s early education programs are accessible to these families, and that they appropriately foster the learning and development of this large and growing group of children. Today’s announcements also mark progress on the President’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative, which aims to ensure that all young people, including children of color, can reach their full potential.

The Federal action include:

  • A New Federal Policy Statement on More Effectively Supporting Dual Language Learners in Early Childhood Programs: The U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education (ED) will release a Federal policy statement on supporting DLLs in early childhood settings. The statement includes comprehensive policy recommendations to States and to early childhood programs. It also recommends that States and local communities work together to ensure that all early childhood programs are welcoming and linguistically accessible to families of DLLs, foster children’s emerging bilingualism and learning more broadly, and support the early childhood workforce in building their capacity to stimulate the learning of DLLs. 

Monday, October 30, 2017

Hoboken Catholic Academy Recognized with National Blue Ribbon Award 2017

Hoboken Catholic School- Hoboken, NJ 
In late September of 2017, the U.S. Department of Education named Hoboken Catholic Academy to its annual list of high-achieving schools, which is based on "a school's overall academic performance or progress in closing achievement gaps among student subgroups."
Here are some features of the school, according to Hoboken Catholic Academy:
"Hoboken Catholic Academy, a Newark Archdiocesan Pre-K to grade eight school, in Hoboken, NJ, serves children from five Catholic parishes in Hoboken and Weehawken as well as children of other faiths. HCA boasts strong academic, extra-curricular and athletic programs with an emphasis on faith formation and service to others. HCA has a supportive parent association that is an integral part of the school. Its graduates excel in high school, earning hundreds of thousands of dollars in Catholic high school scholarships annually."


Hoboken Catholic Academy, a Newark Archdiocesan Pre-K to grade eight school, in Hoboken, NJ, serves children from five Catholic parishes in Hoboken and Weehawken as well as children of other faiths. HCA boasts strong academic, extra-curricular and athletic programs with an emphasis on faith formation and service to others. HCA has a supportive parent association that is an integral part of the school. Its graduates excel in high school, earning hundreds of thousands of dollars in Catholic high school scholarships annually.


Devastated by Super Storm Sandy, HCA suffered a massive oil leak when an abandoned oil tank adjacent to the school erupted during the flooding, pouring four thousand gallons of heating oil under the school. Students were forced to relocate to two other sites for the balance of the 2012-2013 school year. It was uncertain that the school would ever reopen and more than one third of the families left. Through the grace of God and a lot of hard work, the school reopened the following September. Since then HCA has thrived!
With an emphasis on professional development, partnerships with local universities, the infusion of technology across the curriculum and the implementation of best practices, HCA is an outstanding place to learn. Through Campus Ministry, Student Council and the National Junior Honor Society, students facilitate a wide variety of service projects. By providing for Hoboken's homeless, struggling mothers, children in area hospitals, the missions and various other causes, HCA students share God's love with others.
Hoboken Catholic School


Video: Click HERE 

Monday, October 23, 2017

18 Year Longitudinal Analysis of Hoboken City Schools Clearly Shows White Enrollment Has Increased, Free and Reduced Percentages Have Decreased While Accountability Measures Continue to Underperform

Snow storm aftermath- Hoboken, NJ March, 2017 
Are the Hoboken Public Schools experiencing "white flight"? Is the percentage of poor students in the Hoboken School District really 80%? Is the socio-economic demographics of the Hoboken School District the main reason for low test scores? These are all very good questions and thankfully there is independent, NJ Department of Education data that can help us parse the rhetoric from the facts. We will look at 2 specific measures in this post. The percentage of students identified as white and the percentage of students identified as free or reduced lunch over an 18 year period so we can not only see year to year variation but also longer term trends We will then explore whether these socio-economic factors explain aspects of district achievement. 

First, the percentage of white students in the Hoboken Public Schools have INCREASED from 15% in 1999-2000 to 33.2 % in 2015-16 (Figure 1). That is a large increase. 


Figure 1: Percentage of Students Identified as White
Hoboken School District 1998-2016
CLICK TO ENLARGE

Second- Of course, there is variability in the income level of students from families identified as white so the next analysis should look at the percentage of students from families who qualify for "free or reduced lunch" which for a family of four is in the neighborhood of between $32,000 (free) to $43,000 (reduced). During roughly the same time period, the percentage of enrolled students qualifying for "free or reduced lunch" in the Hoboken School District has declined steadily from around 85% in 1998-99 to around 50% in 2015-16 (Figure 2). That is a pretty sizable reduction over time. 


Figure 2:Percentage of Students Identified as "Free or Reduced Lunch"
Hoboken School District 1998-2016
CLICK TO ENLARGE

Third, according to Hoboken Patch.com the Hoboken school district's high school is ranked 332 out of 371 high schools with over 33% considered "not yet meeting college expectations." Given the overall demographics and trends in the district, this is somewhat surprising. 

There is much evidence that socio-economic status (SES) has a positive impact of student achievement and standardized testing. Here is how the Hoboken School District ranked among other "like" school districts in the State of NJ on 2016 PARCC scores (districts classified as "FG" school districts). It would be safe to assume that as a school district's SES profile transitions from a high percentage of free or reduced students to less free or reduced students (from 86% to 52% in the case of Hoboken) and as the percentage of students identified by the district as white increases (from 16% to 32% in the case of Hoboken) we would hope to see a corresponding increase in such outcome measures as student achievement, high school graduation rate, violence and vandalism, and standardized testing. There have been little to no such increases in the Hoboken Public Schools since the 2009-10 school year- the year the political group known as "Kids First" and their various incarnations have had majority control of the Hoboken Board of Education and the education of the children of Hoboken. 

2016 NJPARCC COMPOSTITE MEAN SCORE- ALL “FG” School District
Data: New Jersey Department of Education

COUNTY NAME
DISTRICT NAME
DFG
MEAN SS
OCEAN
LONG BEACH ISLAND
FG
775
BERGEN
NORTHVALE BORO
FG
769
MONMOUTH
SPRING LAKE HEIGHTS BORO
FG
766
UNION
CLARK TWP
FG
762
PASSAIC
LITTLE FALLS TWP
FG
762
MONMOUTH
MATAWAN-ABERDEEN REGIONAL
FG
761
MIDDLESEX
MONROE TWP
FG
761
SUSSEX
SANDYSTON-WALPACK TWP
FG
760
PASSAIC
BLOOMINGDALE BORO
FG
759
WARREN
HOPE TWP
FG
759
HUNTERDON
HOLLAND TWP
FG
758
CAPE MAY
STONE HARBOR BORO
FG
758
BERGEN
DUMONT BORO
FG
757
BERGEN
FORT LEE BORO
FG
757
PASSAIC
NORTH HALEDON BORO
FG
757
BURLINGTON
BORDENTOWN REGIONAL
FG
756
OCEAN
POINT PLEASANT BEACH BORO
FG
756
OCEAN
POINT PLEASANT BORO
FG
756
GLOUCESTER
WOODBURY HEIGHTS BORO
FG
756
MONMOUTH
HOWELL TWP
FG
755
BERGEN
ROCHELLE PARK TWP
FG
755
MIDDLESEX
SOUTH PLAINFIELD BORO
FG
755
GLOUCESTER
MANTUA TWP
FG
754
CAMDEN
COLLINGSWOOD BORO
FG
753
MORRIS
LINCOLN PARK BORO
FG
753
MIDDLESEX
MIDDLESEX BORO
FG
753
BERGEN
NEW MILFORD BORO
FG
753
CAMDEN
GIBBSBORO BORO
FG
752
BERGEN
MAYWOOD BORO
FG
752
GLOUCESTER
SOUTH HARRISON TWP
FG
752
CAPE MAY
UPPER TWP
FG
752
BURLINGTON
HAINESPORT TWP
FG
751
SUSSEX
HARDYSTON TWP
FG
751
GLOUCESTER
LOGAN TWP
FG
751
MIDDLESEX
OLD BRIDGE TWP
FG
751
MORRIS
ROCKAWAY BORO
FG
751
SUSSEX
STILLWATER TWP
FG
751
BERGEN
BERGENFIELD BORO
FG
750
BERGEN
HASBROUCK HEIGHTS BORO
FG
750
ESSEX
NUTLEY TOWN
FG
750
ATLANTIC
PORT REPUBLIC CITY
FG
750
BURLINGTON
SPRINGFIELD TWP
FG
750
SALEM
WOODSTOWN-PILESGROVE REG
FG
750
GLOUCESTER
EAST GREENWICH TWP
FG
749
PASSAIC
WEST MILFORD TWP
FG
749
BERGEN
WOOD-RIDGE BORO
FG
749
BURLINGTON
CINNAMINSON TWP
FG
748
WARREN
KNOWLTON TWP
FG
748
MORRIS
RIVERDALE BORO
FG
748
MORRIS
BOONTON TOWN
FG
747
PASSAIC
POMPTON LAKES BORO
FG
747
SUSSEX
VERNON TWP
FG
747
WARREN
BLAIRSTOWN TWP
FG
746
SUSSEX
FRANKFORD TWP
FG
745
MIDDLESEX
MILLTOWN BORO
FG
745
MORRIS
MINE HILL TWP
FG
745
BURLINGTON
BURLINGTON TWP
FG
744
MIDDLESEX
DUNELLEN BORO
FG
744
MIDDLESEX
NORTH BRUNSWICK TWP
FG
744
MONMOUTH
EATONTOWN BORO
FG
743
CAMDEN
HADDON TWP
FG
743
MERCER
HAMILTON TWP
FG
743
GLOUCESTER
WASHINGTON TWP
FG
743
MONMOUTH
WEST LONG BRANCH BORO
FG
743
HUDSON
HOBOKEN CITY
FG
742
CAMDEN
BARRINGTON BORO
FG
741
BURLINGTON
LUMBERTON TWP
FG
739
HUNTERDON
KINGWOOD TWP
FG
738
MONMOUTH
OCEAN TWP
FG
737
BURLINGTON
DELRAN TWP
FG
736
BURLINGTON
EASTAMPTON TWP
FG
736
WARREN
MANSFIELD TWP
FG
736
GLOUCESTER
PITMAN BORO
FG
736
SUSSEX
HOPATCONG
FG
735
SOMERSET
SOMERVILLE BORO
FG
732
SUSSEX
OGDENSBURG BORO
FG
730
SUSSEX
ANDOVER REG
FG
728




Summary: Over the last two decades in the Hoboken School District, the percentage of students identified as white has increased dramatically. Concurrently and somewhat correspondingly, the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced lunch has decreased significantly. Nonetheless, mandated New Jersey state accountability assessments place the district's high school in the lower percentages of all public and charter school districts in the state and among the lowest within its district factor group.