Wednesday, April 26, 2017

2015-16 Performance Report for Wallace School- Hoboken New Jersey

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:
  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Wallace School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.


2015-16 NJDOE Performance Report - Brandt School, Hoboken NJ

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:
  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Brandt School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.


Tuesday, April 25, 2017

2015-2016 NJDOE Performance Report- Hoboken Junior-Senior High School

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:

  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Hoboken Junior and Senior High School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.



Monday, April 24, 2017

2015-16 Performance Report for Connors School- Hoboken New Jersey

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new 2017 reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:
  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Connors School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

2017 U.S. News Rankings Released- University of Texas College of Education Among Top in Country


George Sanchez College of Education Building
University of Texas at Austin 
U.S. News & World Report has just released its graduate school rankings. The College of Education at The University of Texas at Austin is ranked fourth among public universities and is tied for eleventh overall. The college is ranked third in research expenditures among public universities and fourth overall.
“We are very pleased to once again be ranked among the very best public colleges of education in the country,” said College of Education Dean Manuel J. Justiz. “We remain steadfast in our commitment to excellence within this highly competitive environment.”
Rankings are just one indicator of excellence. The recruitment and retention of outstanding faculty scholars continues to be a top priority as the college works to further enhance graduate and undergraduate programs and secure funded research.
Specific programs and specialty areas in the College of Education continue to be ranked in the top 10:

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Petrosino and Mann (in press) Data Modeling for Pre-Service Teachers and Everyone Else- Journal of College Science Teaching

From: Journal of College Science Teaching
Date: Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 10:18 AM
Subject: Journal of College Science Teaching - Decision on Manuscript ID 2016-Oct-JCST-F-1101.R2

13-Apr-2017

Dear Dr. Petrosino and Ms. Mann:

It is a pleasure to accept your manuscript entitled "Data Modeling for Pre-Service Teachers and Everyone Else" for publication in the Journal of College Science Teaching.  Currently, we publish the majority of our manuscripts within eighteen months of the date of acceptance. A member of our editorial staff will contact you when your manuscript has been chosen for inclusion in a specific issue of the journal.

Thank you for your fine contribution to the Journal of College Science Teaching. I anticipate a very positive response from our readership.

Sincerely,
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of College Science Teaching

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

NSF Sponsored Workshop: Computer Science and Schools of Education

I was honored to be invited to a wonderful NSF sponsored workshop-confernece in New York City on April 8th and 9th. The workshop was centered on bringing computer science into Colleges of Education around the country. In total there were about 30 attendees and I was representing both the College of Education at The University of Texas at Austin as well as the UTeach Natural Sciences Program which I co-founded as well as my involvement with a number of charter schools and public school districts. Overall, it was an excellent workshop, met some new colleagues and reconnected with some old colleagues. Exciting to be part of this national effort and the possibility of some external funding for pursuing research and development in this important and evolving area of not only college education but the entire K-16 trajectory. -Dr. Petrosino 

In order to address critical questions related to the integration of computing education into schools of education, together computer science education researchers, leaders from colleges of education, teacher educators, and computer scientists will participate in a workshop to explore options and share current practices.

The workshop will address the issues surrounding the expansion of computing education into teacher education programs, specifically as it related to schools of education with the following goals:

* To emphasize the importance of computing education as a domain-based education research discipline, like physics or mathematics education.
* To provide models to Colleges of Education for integrating computing education, and especially, to deal with the unique challenges of computing education, e.g., the need to address issues of equity and under-representation.
* To work alongside Colleges of Education to explore credentialing issues with regard to computer science.


Agenda and Strategies for Innovation



We challenge US Colleges of Education to build on the new knowledge and research in computer science education in order to integrate this new discipline into their programs. What we propose is nothing less than a change to the American Education canon. Such enormous change will require innovating in different ways, using different models and strategies, before we find models that work. This workshop is about developing those strategies. As a start, we’re building on existing successful efforts in the largest school districts—New York City and Los Angeles—in the US and by bringing in a group of interdisciplinary faculty from schools of education and computer science to workshops.

The agenda and speaker list will be finalized and shared shortly. Currently planned are sessions regarding international implementations of CS education, integrating CS Education into other subjects, models of teacher development at elementary and MS, and teacher preparation programs and credentialing.

Developing Framework, Models, and Research Agenda for Computing Education

In these workshops, we aim to describe a pathway for schools of education to integrate computing education into their teacher education programs. Schools of Education and pre-service teacher education programs already have existing curricular structures and mandates. Any approach to Computing Education needs to integrate within these existing mechanisms — we cannot take a tabula rasa stance. As a result of the proposed workshop, we anticipate defining the teacher education pipeline for making computing education part of every American student's experience:

1. We plan to define a framework to explain how computing education can coherently be a part of education pre-service programs, e.g., what classes need to be added, what content needs to be added to existing classes.

2. We plan to provide representative models for integrating computing education content into elementary and secondary school programs so that it becomes obvious what content teachers need for teaching different student audiences.

3. The evidence-base for computing teacher development is to shallow. We will need to know more to create our framework and model. We plan to define a research agenda to address the unanswered questions about how computing education fits into primary and secondary school milieux.


Funding for the workshop, Finding a Home for Computing Education in Schools of Education, was provided through grant number 7667100 by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, or conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the CSNYC and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


Monday, April 10, 2017

Pesach Samayach

Pesach Samayach (Happy Passover) to all who celebrate the holiday. Sending everyone, happy Spring love.


The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the story of the Exodus as described in the Hebrew Bible especially in the Book of Exodus, in which the Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. 

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

St. Anthony HS in Jersey City to Close - Press release

I taught at St. Anthony's HS in Jersey City from 1984 to 1987. I will have an additional post at a later time with some reflections and photographs but for the time being, here is the official press release. A sad day for education in general and for Catholic education in Hudson County especially. -Dr. Petrosino 



Click to Enlarge 

Monday, March 27, 2017

Petrosino, A. J. and Mann, M. (in press) Data Modeling for Pre-Service Teachers and Everyone Else- Journal of College Science Teaching

Stevens Institute of Technology- Hoboken NJ 
Dear Dr. Petrosino and Ms. Mann:

Thank you for your careful revisions of Manuscript ID 2016-Oct-JCST-F-1101.R1 entitled "Data Modeling for Pre-Service Teachers and Everyone Else" which you submitted to the Journal of College Science Teaching.  The reviewers have recently completed their evaluation of the your revised manuscript.

The response of our reviewers was positive. However, some of the reviewers feel that the impact of your work will benefit from additional modest modifications. Please consider making small changes in light of the comments and suggestions I've included below. Please make changes within the manuscript for the benefit of all future readers, rather than (solely) addressing questions and comments made by the reviewers.

To submit your revised manuscript, log into http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/nsxxxx and enter your Author Center, where you will find your manuscript title listed under "Manuscripts with Decisions." Under "Actions," click on "Create a Revision." Your manuscript number has been appended to denote a revision.

You will be unable to make your revisions directly on the originally submitted version of the manuscript. Instead, revise your manuscript using a word processing program and save it on your computer. Once the revised manuscript is prepared, you can upload it and submit it through your Author Center. If you decline to make additional modifications, you can upload your existing revision as the new manuscript.

IMPORTANT: Your original files are available to you when you upload your revised manuscript. Please delete any redundant files before completing the submission.

We are always working to facilitate timely publication of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of College Science Teaching. Your revised manuscript should be uploaded as soon as possible. If it is not possible for you to submit your revision in a reasonable amount of time, we may consider your paper as a new submission.

Thank you for submitting your manuscript to the Journal of College Science Teaching, and for your patience in our review process.

Sincerely,
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of College Science Teaching
acutler@nsta.org

Reviewer(s)' Comments to Author:
Reviewer: 1

Comments to the Author
This article could be a nice short how-to piece on introducing the application of basic statistical concepts.

Reviewer: 3

Comments to the Author
The revisions have made the manuscript much better. The diagram added to the understanding of how measurements and data modeling were associated. I also like the theme of getting student away from the cookbook style of laboratory experiments and that the authors discussed the experiments they had students perform....

Reviewer: 2

Comments to the Author
Manuscript is well written and interesting to read.

The authors are making the assumption that the pre-service teachers in this study have a substantial background in science content. I understand that the pre-service teachers are in their senior year, but I think an understanding of their science and math background it important.  I agree with the value of experiences, but pre-service teachers need to be able to couple content with their teaching.

I would like to see [more about]...the academic background of these pre-services teachers.  I'm not suggesting a detailed profile, but a brief description of how many hours of life science, physical science, and math (statistics) they have completed as part of the teacher education program.  In addition, how much laboratory exposure they have experienced as well.  The authors can then make the argument that content coupled with pedagogy helps pre-service teachers understand how data modeling works.

This idea would make a good workshop topic for in-service teachers too.  Especially with so many school districts challenged with implementing NGSS and the need to develop ways to teach science and address the standards.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

Texas betrays teachers, children- Dana Glossbrenner, Special to the Standard-Times

Dana Glossbrenner
Sometimes it is worth noting how teachers from around the country are compensated during their career as well as once they retire. This opinion piece by a retired Texas school teacher shows that in some states the decision to be a career teacher comes with some specific economic concerns. -Dr. Petrosino 

Noting the priorities of our state legislators, I’m ready for a regime change, because current priorities stink. Treatment of retired teachers, coupled with Texas’s low nationwide educational ranking, speaks volumes about how much our legislators care about education, child welfare and human needs.
Yet Texas is a wealthy state.

The latest outrage: The Legislature is systematically stripping retired teachers of retirement benefits. Senate bills 1750 and 1751, introduced by Republican Paul Bettencourt, will begin the process of rolling the retired teachers' pension fund, TRS, into a 401(k) arrangement. Given how little trust exists, it’s probably a shell game to raid the teachers' pension fund because taxpayer dollars have been mismanaged and mis-prioritized for decades.

Don't think for a minute that teachers are being helped.

Another bill will reduce retired teacher health care, raising premiums and deductibles. To top this, those who depend on a teacher retirement pension but who worked other jobs, paying into the Social Security system, do not receive a full pension paid like anyone else with the same amount of payments to the SSA. In Texas and a few other states, a retired teachers' Social Security benefit earned by working other jobs is offset by two-thirds because it is seen as a "windfall."

Texas retired teachers haven't seen a raise in monthly pension payments in 18 years, while inflation has decreased the spending power of their pensions by 2 percent per year. A $2,500 per month retirement in the year 2000 would be $3,500 today if the Teacher Retirement System had been allowed to give cost of living allowances. Thank you, Rick Perry.

Teachers with no Social Security benefit pay Medicare premiums out of more and more meager retirement checks. To top this off, a TRS pensioner can never claim on a spouse's Social Security, even if the spouse dies and that income source disappears. There were measures that could have been taken once upon a time to prevent all this, but the Texas Legislature, under the leadership of Perry and Greg Abbott, did not take action.

These policies scream that teachers aren't important. Teachers never unionized in Texas. Forget them. They generally don't get involved in politics. If you tick off a teacher, you aren't likely to see them at the country club and have an awkward moment. Forget them.

Meanwhile, the Texas economy is in great shape. As of 2015, Texas hosted six of the top 50 companies in the Fortune 500 list and 51 Fortune 500 companies overall. That places Texas third in the nation, after New York and California.

But Texas public education ranks 43rd. The Texas Education Agency has identified 100 under performing schools — just in San Antonio.

In 2012, Texas grossed more than $264.7 billion a year in exports — more than California ($161.9 billion) and New York ($81.4 billion). As a sovereign country, Texas would be the 12th largest economy in the world by GDP (ahead of South Korea and Australia). Yet, the educational system of South Korea is ranked No. 1 in the world, while Australia's is No. 4. The U.S. is No. 17, and Texas is toward the bottom of that.

We're close to the bottom of the heap among the 50 states in many measures of children living in poverty and abuse and of dropout rates, test performance, and college attendance. How can this be, when Texas itself has such a great economy? It’s an economy that produces a huge percentage of the country’s GDP.

Time for regime change.

If retired teachers keep having the screws put to them, many will be in welfare housing. While this vulnerable group is being betrayed, it calls to question the priorities of the Republicans in charge of Texas government. All that wealth. We should have something better to show for it in terms of human needs.

Even worse than the betrayal of teachers, there's the betrayal of children. You can tell lots about a society by the way it treats animals and children. Texas is more like a Third World country in terms of making children a priority. Sure, the Legislature and the governor are looking to strengthen Child Protective Services, finally, but I don't have much faith in the current regime, given their history. They're too busy getting bathroom bills passed.

According to the website Center for Public Priorities: State of Texas Children, 2016, one in four Texas children lives in poverty, with rates among Latinos and black populations three times higher than those for whites and Asians. One in five Texas children live in high-poverty neighborhoods, with higher concentrations for Latinos and blacks. Poverty rates are highest for single Latina mothers (51 percent) and lowest for single white mothers (29 percent). The cards are stacked against single mothers, and especially single minority mothers.

It will be argued that Texas has different demographics from Australia and South Korea and all those other states that rank ahead of it in the educational listings. I say that's all the more reason to focus on education and educators. It will be argued that there are cultural disparities shown in these demographics that make it harder to educate certain children. Again, all the more reason to focus on education and educators.

Many prospective teachers — some excellent ones — will be dissuaded by the priorities in Texas, impoverishing even more an already impoverished system.

Dana Glossbrenner, of San Angelo, is a retired educator turned author.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Move Over, St. Patrick: St. Joseph's Feast Is When Italians Parade

Giorgio's Italian & French Pastry Shop- Hoboken, NJ 2017
The St. Patrick's parade is over and the Irish (and honorary Irish) have gone home to sleep off their annual bout of intemperance, but the multi-generational marchers of the Italian-American St. Joseph Society in New Orleans are only just dusting off their tuxedos and straightening their bow ties. Once the shamrocks and shenanigans have vanished from the narrow streets of the French Quarter, and the keg of green beer is empty, another parade — in honor of an entirely different saint — is beginning to gear up.

Every year on the Saturday nearest March 19, Italian-American Catholic revelers flood the streets in honor of the Feast of St. Joseph, the patron saint of Sicily. The differences between the St. Patrick's Day festivities and the St. Joseph's Day parade are unmistakable. Instead of green, St. Joseph's marchers wear red. Instead of shamrocks, they carry lucky fava beans.

The parade in New Orleans is rooted to a reverent, yet humble start: In 1970, a single pickup truck honoring St. Joseph trailed behind the yearly Irish Channel Parade, according to Mark Fonte, historian for the St. Joseph Society. But the Italian-American community in the city longed for a public way to express their heritage and appreciation for St. Joseph, husband of the Virgin Mary and foster father to Jesus.
Every year, on the Saturday nearest March 19th, a parade and meal steeped in Italian-American traditions honor the feast day of St. Joseph, the patron saint of Sicily. 
Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society. In the early 1970s, the society petitioned for their own parade. "It was around the time that the first Godfather movie came out," says Fonte. "It gave us a big boost. Everybody wanted to be Italian."
There are St. Joseph's celebrations across the country — and the world — but none so big, bold or festive as in New Orleans. This year, more than 300 marchers and 11 floats will trek down Chartres Street, past the green-shuttered building where former New Orleans Mayor Nicholas Girod offered his residence as a haven to exiled Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815. Leading the procession is a rolling altar bearing Italian food and relics dedicated to St. Joseph. Many local Catholic churches, families and stores also construct altars.