Wednesday, April 26, 2017

2015-16 Performance Report for Wallace School- Hoboken New Jersey

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:
  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Wallace School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.


2015-16 NJDOE Performance Report - Brandt School, Hoboken NJ

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:
  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Brandt School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.


Tuesday, April 25, 2017

2015-2016 NJDOE Performance Report- Hoboken Junior-Senior High School

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:

  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Hoboken Junior and Senior High School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.



Monday, April 24, 2017

2015-16 Performance Report for Connors School- Hoboken New Jersey

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) released the state’s School Performance Reports for the 2015-2016 school year. The new 2017 reports include more information on attendance for students and faculty; more data on high school college entrance examination performance; and other changes:
“The school performance reports are designed to inform and empower students, parents, and school communities, not only to celebrate areas of success, but also to highlight areas in need of improvement,” said Acting Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, requires states to produce annual school performance reports. New Jersey’s School Performance Reports, in conjunction with federal accountability for schools under ESSA and state accountability for districts under the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability Continuum (NJQSAC), contribute unique sets of indicators and/or requirements that define accountability for education in the state.
In a statement, the NJDOE said the reports reflect a more comprehensive view of student academic performance and experiences, as compared to the state’s other state and federal accountability systems. The changes to the 2015-2016 School Performance Reports this year are the start of a process to redesign the reports to be more user-friendly and informative for communities.

Changes to the School Performance Reports for the 2015-16 school year, based on feedback from educators, include:
  • Faculty Attendance – All reports now include a table that shows faculty attendance, which represents the percentage of days the school faculty members were present during the school year.
  • Chronic Absenteeism – A graph that shows chronic absenteeism, which is represented by the percentage of enrolled students each year who were chronically absent, is now included in high school reports.
  • PSAT and ACT Performance – High school reports now include PSAT and ACT participation and performance data, whereas previous reports only included SAT test data.
  • AP/IB tests – The count of all Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate tests taken in all subjects that met or exceeded the benchmark are now included in the high school reports.
  • Career and Technical Education – High school reports now include the percentage of students who are concentrating in approved career and technical education programs. Concentrators are students who have completed more than one course in a program.
  • Peer Schools Removed – The peer schools comparisons, which compared each school to a group of similar schools, have been removed.
  • User-Friendly Data – The reports are now on a web-based interface with improved navigation.

The NJDOE is also requesting public input to help shape the School Performance Reports for the 2016-2017 school year and beyond. Any interested members of the public wanting to provide their input can do so by completing the department’s survey.

The following is the most recent Performance Report for Connors School. In the coming days this site will make available the Performance Reports for other public schools.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

2017 U.S. News Rankings Released- University of Texas College of Education Among Top in Country


George Sanchez College of Education Building
University of Texas at Austin 
U.S. News & World Report has just released its graduate school rankings. The College of Education at The University of Texas at Austin is ranked fourth among public universities and is tied for eleventh overall. The college is ranked third in research expenditures among public universities and fourth overall.
“We are very pleased to once again be ranked among the very best public colleges of education in the country,” said College of Education Dean Manuel J. Justiz. “We remain steadfast in our commitment to excellence within this highly competitive environment.”
Rankings are just one indicator of excellence. The recruitment and retention of outstanding faculty scholars continues to be a top priority as the college works to further enhance graduate and undergraduate programs and secure funded research.
Specific programs and specialty areas in the College of Education continue to be ranked in the top 10:

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Petrosino and Mann (in press) Data Modeling for Pre-Service Teachers and Everyone Else- Journal of College Science Teaching

From: Journal of College Science Teaching
Date: Thu, Apr 13, 2017 at 10:18 AM
Subject: Journal of College Science Teaching - Decision on Manuscript ID 2016-Oct-JCST-F-1101.R2

13-Apr-2017

Dear Dr. Petrosino and Ms. Mann:

It is a pleasure to accept your manuscript entitled "Data Modeling for Pre-Service Teachers and Everyone Else" for publication in the Journal of College Science Teaching.  Currently, we publish the majority of our manuscripts within eighteen months of the date of acceptance. A member of our editorial staff will contact you when your manuscript has been chosen for inclusion in a specific issue of the journal.

Thank you for your fine contribution to the Journal of College Science Teaching. I anticipate a very positive response from our readership.

Sincerely,
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of College Science Teaching

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

NSF Sponsored Workshop: Computer Science and Schools of Education

I was honored to be invited to a wonderful NSF sponsored workshop-confernece in New York City on April 8th and 9th. The workshop was centered on bringing computer science into Colleges of Education around the country. In total there were about 30 attendees and I was representing both the College of Education at The University of Texas at Austin as well as the UTeach Natural Sciences Program which I co-founded as well as my involvement with a number of charter schools and public school districts. Overall, it was an excellent workshop, met some new colleagues and reconnected with some old colleagues. Exciting to be part of this national effort and the possibility of some external funding for pursuing research and development in this important and evolving area of not only college education but the entire K-16 trajectory. -Dr. Petrosino 

In order to address critical questions related to the integration of computing education into schools of education, together computer science education researchers, leaders from colleges of education, teacher educators, and computer scientists will participate in a workshop to explore options and share current practices.

The workshop will address the issues surrounding the expansion of computing education into teacher education programs, specifically as it related to schools of education with the following goals:

* To emphasize the importance of computing education as a domain-based education research discipline, like physics or mathematics education.
* To provide models to Colleges of Education for integrating computing education, and especially, to deal with the unique challenges of computing education, e.g., the need to address issues of equity and under-representation.
* To work alongside Colleges of Education to explore credentialing issues with regard to computer science.


Agenda and Strategies for Innovation



We challenge US Colleges of Education to build on the new knowledge and research in computer science education in order to integrate this new discipline into their programs. What we propose is nothing less than a change to the American Education canon. Such enormous change will require innovating in different ways, using different models and strategies, before we find models that work. This workshop is about developing those strategies. As a start, we’re building on existing successful efforts in the largest school districts—New York City and Los Angeles—in the US and by bringing in a group of interdisciplinary faculty from schools of education and computer science to workshops.

The agenda and speaker list will be finalized and shared shortly. Currently planned are sessions regarding international implementations of CS education, integrating CS Education into other subjects, models of teacher development at elementary and MS, and teacher preparation programs and credentialing.

Developing Framework, Models, and Research Agenda for Computing Education

In these workshops, we aim to describe a pathway for schools of education to integrate computing education into their teacher education programs. Schools of Education and pre-service teacher education programs already have existing curricular structures and mandates. Any approach to Computing Education needs to integrate within these existing mechanisms — we cannot take a tabula rasa stance. As a result of the proposed workshop, we anticipate defining the teacher education pipeline for making computing education part of every American student's experience:

1. We plan to define a framework to explain how computing education can coherently be a part of education pre-service programs, e.g., what classes need to be added, what content needs to be added to existing classes.

2. We plan to provide representative models for integrating computing education content into elementary and secondary school programs so that it becomes obvious what content teachers need for teaching different student audiences.

3. The evidence-base for computing teacher development is to shallow. We will need to know more to create our framework and model. We plan to define a research agenda to address the unanswered questions about how computing education fits into primary and secondary school milieux.


Funding for the workshop, Finding a Home for Computing Education in Schools of Education, was provided through grant number 7667100 by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, or conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the CSNYC and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


Monday, April 10, 2017

Pesach Samayach

Pesach Samayach (Happy Passover) to all who celebrate the holiday. Sending everyone, happy Spring love.


The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the story of the Exodus as described in the Hebrew Bible especially in the Book of Exodus, in which the Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. 

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

St. Anthony HS in Jersey City to Close - Press release

I taught at St. Anthony's HS in Jersey City from 1984 to 1987. I will have an additional post at a later time with some reflections and photographs but for the time being, here is the official press release. A sad day for education in general and for Catholic education in Hudson County especially. -Dr. Petrosino 



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